Beiträge von Hippo

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    Why Vinyl’s Boom Is Over - As purists complain about low quality and high prices, vinyl sales taper off; Gillian Welch and David Rawlings cut their own records.

    Gillian Welch and David Rawlings were disappointed by the quality of vinyl production today so they bought their own lathe to cut records themselves.

    Folk music duo Gillian Welch and David Rawlings were frustrated by the quality of vinyl LPs being produced today. So they decided to cut their records themselves.

    “What people do nowadays is take a digital file and just run vinyl off that,” says Mr. Rawlings, a lanky musician who plays a 1935 Epiphone Olympic guitar. “In my mind, if we were going to do it, I wanted to do it the way the records I love were made—from analog tapes.”

    The Nashville-based singer-songwriters, who gained fame with “O Brother, Where Art Thou” in 2000, spent $100,000 to buy their own record-cutting contraption in 2013. The cutting lathe makes the master copy of a record—the one sent to a pressing plant for mass reproduction. The couple’s first LP, a re-issue of their 2011 Grammy-nominated “The Harrow & the Harvest,” arrives July 28.

    Ms. Welch and Mr. Rawlings have gone to extreme lengths to solve a problem many music aficionados say is an open secret in the music industry: Behind the resurgence of vinyl records in recent years, the quality of new LPs often stinks.

    Old LPs were cut from analog tapes—that’s why they sound so high quality. But the majority of today’s new and re-issued vinyl albums—around 80% or more, several experts estimate—start from digital files, even lower-quality CDs. These digital files are often loud and harsh-sounding, optimized for ear-buds, not living rooms. So the new vinyl LP is sometimes inferior to what a consumer hears on a CD.

    “They’re re-issuing [old albums] and not using the original tapes” to save time and money, says Michael Fremer, editor of AnalogPlanet.com and one of America’s leading audio authorities. “They have the tapes. They could take them out and have it done right—by a good engineer. They don’t.”

    As more consumers discover this disconnect, vinyl sales are starting to slow. In the first half of 2015, sales of vinyl records jumped 38% compared to the same period the prior year, to 5.6 million units, Nielsen Music data show. A year later, growth slowed to 12%. This year, sales rose a modest 2%. “It’s flattening out,” says Steve Sheldon, president of Los Angeles pressing plant Rainbo Records. While he doesn’t see a bubble bursting—plants are busy—he believes vinyl is “getting close to plateauing.”

    When labels advertise a re-issued classic as mastered from the original analog tapes, the source can be more complicated. Sometimes they are a hodge-podge of digital and analog. Often “labels are kind of hiding what’s really happening,” says Russell Elevado, a veteran studio engineer and producer who has earned two Grammys working with R&B singer D’Angelo.

    Mr. Rawlings says a Netherlands-based label, Music On Vinyl, used a CD to make vinyl copies of Ms. Welch’s 2003 album “Soul Journey,” getting a license from Warner Music Group. Ms. Welch and Mr. Rawlings, who didn’t have rights to release the album in the U.K., found out when fans saw the vinyl selling on the Internet. They successfully convinced Music On Vinyl to destroy the 500 copies that had been pressed, reimbursing the firm 3,300 euros for its costs. “This is commonplace,” Mr. Rawlings says. A representative of Music On Vinyl could not be reached.

    Today’s digital files can sound fantastic—especially for hip-hop and dance music. But engineers say they need to be mastered separately for vinyl in order to have the right sound. To meet deadlines for releasing new albums, labels can’t always cut vinyl to the absolute best audio quality, says Mr. Fields, who declined to discuss specific examples on the record because it might alienate others in the industry.

    Another culprit for vinyl’s slowdown is cost: Mr. Sheldon estimates vinyl has gone up four to six dollars per album in recent years. So-called “180-gram” or “audiophile” records, marketed as higher quality, can cost $30 to $40. Their heaviness makes them more stable during playing, Mr. Sheldon says, and such records might last longer. But any sound differences are “very marginal.”

    As low-quality vinyl proliferates, Ms. Welch and Mr. Rawlings are taking the high road. It took five years to get their record-cutting equipment up and running. Once they bought their lathe, they found a tech who gave up his job at a particle accelerator for the new job. “The scientists who developed how to cut good stereo were the brightest people in our country at that time,” Mr. Rawlings says. With their trusted mastering engineer Stephen Marcussen, the team customized the lathe for Ms. Welch and Mr. Rawlings’ sparse, haunting acoustic music.

    Songs are generally recorded in a studio digitally today. (In Ms. Welch and Mr. Rawlings’ case, they chose to record using analog tape.) A mastering engineer then fine-tunes the recorded music to ensure the album, often the product of myriad studios, sounds consistent. Using a lathe, the music is engraved onto a “lacquer,” the technical term for the master copy from which copies are pressed in plants.

    A cutting lathe, like this one, is a rare, arcane piece of equipment. It makes a ‘lacquer,’ or original copy of a record, which is sent to a pressing plant to be duplicated. Only a few technicians still know how to fix cutting lathes. Most of them have died. A cutting lathe, like this one, is a rare, arcane piece of equipment. It makes a ‘lacquer,’ or original copy of a record, which is sent to a pressing plant to be duplicated. Only a few technicians still know how to fix cutting lathes. Most of them have died. PHOTO: BISHOP MARCUSSEN The goal is to put as much sonic information on the record as possible. A high-quality LP can give listeners the sensation of instruments or sounds occupying different points in space—a “three-dimensional” quality that Mr. Fremer says evokes a live performance. Ms. Welch likens it to the difference between “fresh basil and dried basil.”

    The vinyl version of “The Harrow & the Harvest” is “mesmerizing,” says Mr. Fremer, who heard a test copy. On Aug. 11, the couple, which often records as “Gillian Welch,” will release a new album, “Poor David’s Almanack,” under the “David Rawlings” name, before re-releasing more old albums. Having launched a label and souped up a derelict Nashville studio years ago, they may cut and re-issue albums by other artists, they said, effectively becoming a full-service, vertically-integrated—if tiny—old-school music company.

    Ms. Welch and Mr. Rawlings, whose careers took off as the CD era crashed into the age of iTunes, feel like putting out vinyl now brings them full circle. “It’s like an author who has only ever released an e-Book,” Mr. Rawlings says. “You see a book in print and bound and you feel like you’ve finally done what you were aiming to do.”

    :)Gillian Welch steht für Qualität, lang hat es gedauert bis Ihre Vinyl-Scheibe erscheint, hier steht warum:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/w…s-boom-is-over-1500721202


    Zitat:

    It took five years to get their record-cutting equipment up and running.........The vinyl version of “The Harrow & the Harvest” is “mesmerizing,” says Mr. Fremer, who heard a test copy. On Aug. 11, the couple, which often records as “Gillian Welch,” will release a new album, “Poor David’s Almanack,” under the “David Rawlings” name, before re-releasing more old albums. Having launched a label and souped up a derelict Nashville studio years ago, they may cut and re-issue albums by other artists, they said, effectively becoming a full-service, vertically-integrated—if tiny—old-school music company.

    Guten Abend Plattenfreaks,
    heut um 23 Uhr stellt Vinylpapst Wolfgang Doebeling auf Radio Eins Berlin seine liebsten LP´s des letzten Jahres vor, mit dabei wird auf jeden Fall auch die Scheibe sein , die sich gerade auf meinem Teller drehte.
    The Secret Sisters 180 Gramm feinstes Vinyl 100%Analog aufgenommen Herrlich altmodich auch die Musike <img src=" height="39"> 

    Als ich heute eine Kritik zu Rufus Wainwrights neuem Album las,
    erfuhr ich vom Tode seiner Mutter Kate in diesem Januar.
    Seit Mitte der 70er hatten die beiden Mcgarrigle-Schwestern Kate+Anna
    so mit das Schönste an Musik dargeboten, was mir so als "Folk" zu Ohren kam.
    Da gute Musik auf Vinyl zu Unserer Freude nicht mitstirbt habe ich
    in Memoriam einige Ihrer schönsten Scheiben gehöhrt.
    Und da ich Ihre erste und beste Scheibe von 1975 gerade nicht finden kann,
    kam auch noch Maria Muldaur´s Debut von 1974 auf den Teller mit
    einer wundervollen Version von Kates "Work Song"

    Kate links Anna Rechts




    Grüsse Thomas <img src=" height="39">

    Hi Mario,


    (Namensaufkleber?)


    ne hab ich nich, war damals so ne Marotte,


    Übrigens Nachtrag:


    -Rosanne Cash-


    schöne neue Scheibe: "The List"


    hab ich letzes Jahr mit dem Programm in Köln in der Kulturkirche life gesehen und GEHÖHRT :thumbup: 
    Wohlklang pur!


    Hippotommy

    _essra.jpg_Marshall.jpg_X-dreams.jpg_Life-in-Paris.jpg_youre-the-One.jpgHallo zusammen,


    Ich bin recht neu hier , aber das Genre Frauenstimmen verfolge ich seit frühester Jugend :P 
    hab den ganzen langen 6 Jahre währenden T. durchsucht und war erstaunt das meine Lieblingssängerin


    "Lucinda Williams"


    nicht eimal erwähnt wurde ( live der Oberhammer , Schande über Euch! )
    von Ihr habe ich bislang aber nur Digitales ( Schande über Mich!, muss geändert werden!)


    habe gerade meinen analogen Giftschrank durchsucht, hier ein paar Geheimtips (Siehe Bilder oben):


    1 ) Essra Mohawk "Burnin Shinin" meine einzige Analoge von Ihr (leider nicht Ihre Beste , aber auch höhrenswert)
    2 ) Marshall Chapman hier "Marshall" von 1979, Ihre rockigste Scheibe (und die schärfste, Anspieltip "Don´t make me pregnant" :D )
    3a) Anette Peacock ( die wirklich Andere! wurde hier schon einmal erwähnt, immerhin!)
    zuerst "I´m the One" von 1972 mit einer Mörderversion von Love me tender! (ultrarar)
    3b) Anette "Live in Paris" von 1981" excellente Lifeaufnahme (genauso rar)
    3c) Anettes "X-Dreams" von 1978 nicht ganz so selten aber extrem gut -Der Titel sagt alles!-


    Grüsse aus dem Rheinland


    Thomas "Hippotommy"